New Year’s Resolutions

New Year’s Resolutions

At the beginning of every year the air is filled with the word “resolution”.  In our culture of constant striving for success and some level of perfection, we tend to think of these resolutions as a way to strong arm our way into effecting change in our lives; loosing that extra weight, giving up soda, being more physically active, training for a half marathon, saving more money, etc. The University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology states that the percentage of success of those who set a resolution for the New Year is 8%.

The English word resolution comes from the Latin resolutionem which means a breaking into parts or a process of reducing things into a simpler form. In music this term means a move from a dissonance (or unsettled sound) to a consonance (or a final, more settled sound). If we consolidate these two definitions into one … A process of breaking down what is dissonant or unsettled in our being and moving into a simpler, peaceful, more harmonious form.  When reading this, I’m reminded of Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra, yogas chitta vritti nirodha. Or the cessation of the “mind stuff” (chatter, racing thoughts, inner critic) is yoga.

So, let’s go back to that 8% success rate of resolutions. It is possible that the reason so few make a difference in effecting real change in their lives is that a great deal of these ideas are born of that “mind stuff”. That voice in our head telling us that we need to be thinner, more fit, have more money, manage our time more efficiently, etc. What if instead we applied the real meaning of resolution to our lives? What if we were to break down the power of that mind chatter with every breath and come back to our natural state of peace, simplicity, harmony with all beings? What if we applied the practice of yoga on and off the mat, the practice of unconditional love and compassion for ourselves & others? What change might be then effected?
Jenna teaches both the art of yoga and the art of connecting with your authentic voice.  The yoga practice has greatly clarified and reinforced Jenna’s many years of classical voice training.

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